Preventing Tarantula Smuggling

December 17, 2010 at 10:31 pm Leave a comment

The consequences for smuggling wildlife is a federal prison sentence of up to 2 years and a fine of up to $250,000 – yet that doesn’t deter some people from trying to make a profit. A tarantula dealer was recently caught bringing over 600 tarantulas into the country by the US Department of Fish & Wildlife. Many of these tarantulas were the species Brachypelma smithi – the Mexican Redknee.

Mexican Redknee

Tarantulas like the Mexican Redknee face a combined threat of  poaching for hobbyists, systematic extermination based on fear, and habitat loss. Other tarantulas, such as the Sapphire Gooty Ornamental, an Indian species has been listed as Critically Endangered by the IUCN (International Union for Conservation of Nature) which means that in three generations (about 15-20 years for this animal) their population has dropped to between 1-20% of what it used to be. That means a minimum of 4 out of 5 of these spiders is gone.

Sapphire Gooty Ornamental

No animal simultaneously makes people fall into a category of fear, disgust, or indifference as much as tarantulas. But these misunderstood giants of the arachnid world have a valuable new ally in the Butterfly Pavilion’s Breeding and Conservation Research team!

Just a few short weeks ago, while the aforementioned tarantula dealer was out plucking these already declining tarantula populations from their homes, Butterfly Pavilion zookeepers and researchers (Troy Miller, Chad Haines, and Amber Lynn Partridge) began to switch their captive breeding focus to none other than the Mexican Redknee. The Butterfly Pavilion hopes to be a resource for these spiders, not just for hobbyists, but for educational facilities as well.

 

Last month the Butterfly Pavilion was able to provide nearly 300 spiders to facilities across the country such as the KSU department of entomology – making poaching in the wild unnecessary.
 
Butterfly Pavilion research on tarantula growth is also underway to provide information about tarantula conservation by asking questions like “How fast can they grow? How long before we can turn 2 healthy adult tarantulas into 200 healthy adult tarantulas?”
 
Answers to these questions are still unknown for most species of tarantulas. What we do know is that the WRI (World Resources Institute) estimates that an average of 100 species of life goes extinct every day. We also know that we’re doing our best to educate others about the importance of conservation and provide them with alternatives because the Butterfly Pavilion and the many people who support our efforts realize the intrinsic value to even the creepiest of crawlies.

By  Zookeepers:  Troy Miller, Chad Haines, and Amber Lynn Partridge

Click the link to view the orginal article about the tarantula smuggling:  http://articles.latimes.com/2010/dec/04/local/la-me-spiders-20101204 
 
 
 
 

 

 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

Advertisements

Entry filed under: Entomology. Tags: , , , , , .

Butterfly Pavilion launches new holiday lights event Red Powderpuff (Calliandra haematocephala)

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Trackback this post  |  Subscribe to the comments via RSS Feed


Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 6 other followers

Twitter Updates


%d bloggers like this: